I interviewed virginity auctioner Elizabeth Raine, and we busted a bunch of virginity myths along the way. Here’s an excerpt. Read the whole thing at Nerve.

Which brings me to the question of what “virginity” means to you. What are you auctioning? I think losing virginity is having heterosexual intercourse for the first time. If you are referring to another type of intercourse it needs to be clarified, for instance “I lost my oral virginity.”
So what do you think the appeal or fascination is for a guy? What do you think they think they’re buying? For some reason or another it is a sexual fantasy [to have a virgin]. In some cases, I think they want to take on the role of sexual teacher. In others, they just want to try something new. And then there are some men who are just attracted to the idea of an untouched woman.
I always assumed it was the desire for “first penis in” like planting your flag on uncharted territory or something.  Men are very competitive and territorial creatures.
I sometimes think that if men are stupid enough to pay for a social construct, let them. I can’t disagree with that.
I really hate the mythology virginity auctions perpetuate. As long as there hasn’t been a penis inside a woman, she and her body have value. But once that happens, she has none. No one auctions off the second time they have intercourse.  Well that’s not necessarily true, women with all levels of sexual experience are selling sex somewhere. I’m not saying that makes it right, but I do think it is more of a continuum than you think. Men preferring less ‘promiscuous’ women is not a phenomenon limited to virgins.
They are, but adding the #virginity seems to increase the value exponentially. I’m not sure Natalie would have gotten much interest if she had already had intercourse and was offering the second time to a lucky bidder. Do you? I agree the value is inflated. Here is one more idea: The first time is a mystery. So, being in the position of the virgin, if you are going to lose it under these circumstances, it should pay well.

I interviewed virginity auctioner Elizabeth Raine, and we busted a bunch of virginity myths along the way. Here’s an excerpt. Read the whole thing at Nerve.

Which brings me to the question of what “virginity” means to you. What are you auctioning?
I think losing virginity is having heterosexual intercourse for the first time. If you are referring to another type of intercourse it needs to be clarified, for instance “I lost my oral virginity.”

So what do you think the appeal or fascination is for a guy? What do you think they think they’re buying?
For some reason or another it is a sexual fantasy [to have a virgin]. In some cases, I think they want to take on the role of sexual teacher. In others, they just want to try something new. And then there are some men who are just attracted to the idea of an untouched woman.

I always assumed it was the desire for “first penis in” like planting your flag on uncharted territory or something. 
Men are very competitive and territorial creatures.

I sometimes think that if men are stupid enough to pay for a social construct, let them.
I can’t disagree with that.

I really hate the mythology virginity auctions perpetuate. As long as there hasn’t been a penis inside a woman, she and her body have value. But once that happens, she has none. No one auctions off the second time they have intercourse. 
Well that’s not necessarily true, women with all levels of sexual experience are selling sex somewhere. I’m not saying that makes it right, but I do think it is more of a continuum than you think. Men preferring less ‘promiscuous’ women is not a phenomenon limited to virgins.

They are, but adding the #virginity seems to increase the value exponentially. I’m not sure Natalie would have gotten much interest if she had already had intercourse and was offering the second time to a lucky bidder. Do you?
I agree the value is inflated. Here is one more idea: The first time is a mystery. So, being in the position of the virgin, if you are going to lose it under these circumstances, it should pay well.

Inject some feminism into your Passover Seder with “The Women’s Dayenu”

MiriamsCup

For all of my fellow feminists preparing to celebrate Passover, I want to share something we read every year along with the traditional “Dayenu.” The Women’s Dayenu was written by Canadian journalist, activist and feminist Michelle Landsberg many years ago. Her columns were what helped me and other young Canadians become the feminists we are today.

For extra credit, check out the book Miriam’s Cup, above, the story of Moses’ sister Miriam and her inspiring role in the Passover story. We honor her by placing her goblet next to the one for Eliyahu, filled with water to symbolize her Well.

We say this Dayenu after the original one, with each person at the table reading one line. It made an appearance in my 2005 film I Was A Teenage Feminist, it still provokes much eye-rolling and commentary at our Seder table, which is why we love doing it. Hag Sameach!

If Eve had been created in the Image of God and not as a helper to Adam,
DAYENU

If she had been created as Adam’s equal and not been considered a temptress,
DAYENU

If Lot’s wife had been honored for compassion for looking back at the fate of her family in Sodom, and had not been punished for it,
DAYENU

If our mothers had been honoured for their daughters as well as for their sons,
DAYENU

If our fathers had not pitted our mothers against each other, like Abraham with Sarah and Hagar, or Jacob with Leah and Rachel,
DAYENU

If the Just Women in Egypt who caused our redemption had been given sufficient recognition,
DAYENU

If Miriam were given her seat with Moses and Aaron in our legacy,
DAYENU

If women had written the Haggadah and placed our mothers where they belong in history,
DAYENU

If every generation of women together with every generation of men would continue to go out of Egypt,
DAYENU

exposingfakeclinics
Just discovered this fantastic tumblr on CPCs (fake repro health clinics) from @NARAL.
exposingfakeclinics:

This is a REAL pamphlet given to a young person at a crisis pregnancy center.  According to them, using a condom is “about as safe as hanging over a cliff with a frayed rope.”  
Talk about lies and misinformation.  Crisis pregnancy centers (CPCs) pose as legitimate reproductive health centers. They have a track record of outright lying to women and work to dissuade people from exercising the right to choose. They often advertise as if they provide abortion services, drawing people in by promising free reproductive health services, including free pregnancy tests, ultrasounds, and options counseling.
#CallOutCPCs

Just discovered this fantastic tumblr on CPCs (fake repro health clinics) from @NARAL.

exposingfakeclinics:

This is a REAL pamphlet given to a young person at a crisis pregnancy center.  According to them, using a condom is “about as safe as hanging over a cliff with a frayed rope.”  

Talk about lies and misinformation.  

Crisis pregnancy centers (CPCs) pose as legitimate reproductive health centers. They have a track record of outright lying to women and work to dissuade people from exercising the right to choose. They often advertise as if they provide abortion services, drawing people in by promising free reproductive health services, including free pregnancy tests, ultrasounds, and options counseling.

#CallOutCPCs

While it may be tempting to draw a red line around Christian fundamentalist views on gender and sexuality to distinguish them from supposedly evolved “secular” culture, there is considerable, uncomfortable overlap between the two.
"The right’s warped “purity” culture: 4 ways evangelical views of sex took over America" More at Salon